Skip to content

Welcome to ACES

Alamo Colleges Education Services is a secure portal connecting Faculty, Staff & Students to Academic Resources, Email, and other Online Resources.

Support Contacts: Helpdesk: 210-485-0555 | Weather Line: 210-485-0189

Vertical_Bar 

Login to ACES

Click Here to Login
For additional information, visit the Student Logins page.

Close

St. Philip's College Library 

MLK Campus: (210) 486-2330
Location: Center for Learning Resources (CLR)

SWC Campus: (210) 486-7023
Location: Building 1-C123

Vertical_Bar 
Library Info  
Close

St. Philip’s College
Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration

September 15 – October 15, 2014
"Hispanics: A Legacy of History, A Present of Action and a Future of Success"

Straight from the Taco Truck  Wednesday, September 17
Straight from the Taco Truck

11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Heritage Pavilion
A la cart pricing – Cash only.
Event is FREE and open to the public.
 
Cesar Chavez Film  Wednesday, October 8
Hispanic Cinema: “Cesar Chavez”

12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
MLK Campus: Heritage Room
The film follows Chávez's efforts to organize 50,000 farm workers in California, many of whom were braceros—temporary workers from Mexico permitted to live and work in the United States in agriculture, and required to return to Mexico if they stopped working. Working conditions are very poor for the braceros, who also suffer from racism and brutality at the hands of the employers and local Californians. 
HHM - Best Tasting Salsa Competition  Wednesday, October 8
6th Annual Best Testing Salsa Competition

4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Heritage Room
Richard Carmona  Thursday, October 9
President's Lecture Series:
Speaker, Richard Carmona, MD (former US Surgeon General)

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Watson Fine Arts Center
Richard Carmona, MD Bio 
Cesar Chavez Film  Wednesday, October 15
Hispanic Cinema: “Cesar Chavez”

11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
SW Campus: Tiger Bistro Conference Center (Tentative)
The film follows Chávez's efforts to organize 50,000 farm workers in California, many of whom were braceros—temporary workers from Mexico permitted to live and work in the United States in agriculture, and required to return to Mexico if they stopped working. Working conditions are very poor for the braceros, who also suffer from racism and brutality at the hands of the employers and local Californians.